Jackie Reeve is a senior staff writer covering bedding, organization, and home goods at Wirecutter since 2015. Previously she was a school librarian, and she’s been a quilter for about 15 years. Her quilt patterns and her other written work have appeared in various publications. She moderates Wirecutter’s staff book club and makes her bed every morning. These bags are quick to compress, and they reduced more volume than others we tested. IKEA’s Boaxel system allows you to easily and inexpensively mix and match components to get the setup you need.

We tested the larger bag (28 by 20½ by 15¾ inches) with our bulkiest bedding and still had room to throw in the duvet cover and some sheets. We think the smaller bag (24½ by 18 by 12½ inches) would work well for seasonal kids bedding and guest bedding. A basic, 3-foot-wide wire-shelf system typically costs more than $550 and really pulls ahead of our other closet-system picks with its wood components, which start closer to $1,000. However, for you to get the most value for your money, we think it makes sense to invest in an Elfa system only if you plan to live in your space for at least five years. These dividers might not be practical if you really need to save space, due to their thickness.

Owner reviews are generally strong; people say they like the wardrobe’s tall height and the number of options available to configure the inside. This hook rack takes advantage of lost space on the back of a closet door and is great for bulkier items like robes or towels. Stable and slim, these dividers are the best we tested to keep your stacked linens, sweaters, or bags in order without a hassle. A larger home desk is perfect in bigger homes where you need a lot of workspace. If you have a dedicated home office, you can go for a big desk that becomes the focal point of your room.

The cream-colored, opaque heavy-duty plastic conceals the contents, keeping clutter out of sight, but you can label the bins on the hand-holds to ensure nothing is out-of-sight, out-of-mind. The Boaxel system is slightly more expensive than the Algot—about $20 more for this basic 4-foot-wide kit, which is similar to the Algot system we used to recommend. We’ve had several wire systems from brands like ClosetMaid wood planks for shelving and Rubbermaid, and the metal edges are not as smoothly finished; Jackie has cut herself on them more than once during installation. Although we didn’t bring closet systems in for testing, we did spend about 11 hours researching them online and in stores. We paid attention to the quality of the materials, the construction , how they were installed, the availability, any extra accessories, and the price.

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IKEA’s Boaxel and Jonaxel lines are available in-store and online, and they will always work together. One of our senior staff writers bought a ClosetMaid system to organize his pantry and also said it was confusing to install. For storing towels, robes, and other items on the back of a door, we like the Spectrum Duchess Over the Door 5-Hook Rack. This rack is solidly built, with large oval nubs at the end of each hook to keep clothing firmly in place. When we tested this rack for our guide to gear for small apartments, we found that it hung easily over our tester’s 1½-inch-thick door with ¼ inch of overhang; it wiggled a little, although not so much as to annoy her. Some online commenters complain that the bracket makes it hard to shut the door, but, depending on the clearance between the door and the frame, this could happen with any over-the-door rack.